Centenary Institute Medical Innovation Award 2018

Stage: Competition Finished

ABOUT THE AWARDS


The Centenary Institute's Medical Innovation Awards recognise bold young researchers who are taking the risks to ask the big questions of today - those questions that have most people saying “but that’s impossible”.


The Awards focus on creativity - the essential ingredient in all human endeavour, whether in science, art or marketing. It will be presented to the biomedical research scientist based in Australia who demonstrates the greatest creativity in their scientific approach in a given year. Each year tens of thousands are engaged and inspired by the high quality entries, making it the largest and most prestigious national research Awards for young biomedical researchers in Australia.


“The award is highly regarded amongst the scientific community and it has helped me gain additional publicity in both the public and scientific community for my research program. The award has also helped me justify the quality of my work to people both in and outside my field of research. One of the highlights was the awards night, where I was able network with other up and coming Australian scientists who are doing cutting edge research and also other members of the community. I was very impressed with how some members of the community have embraced science and have show a great willingness to promote its importance to Australians more broadly.” Dr James Hudson, Winner of the 2017 1st In Memory of Neil Lawrence Prize from the University of Queensland. View Dr Hudson's 2017 application supporting video.


View the full Award website



WHY IS A PRIZE LIKE THIS IMPORTANT?


80% of the biggest scientific discoveries for humanity (Nobel laureates) have come from researchers younger than 45 years of age.


There are only 20,000 early to mid career researchers in Australia. Only a handful get funding to test their own creative ideas. The vast majority have to leave research altogether.


Exceptional young scientists can be hard to keep in Australia and we hope this award will not only celebrate their achievements but also encourage a domestic culture of brilliance in medical research,” Centenary Institute Executive Director, Professor Mathew Vadas AO.


WHAT THE 2018 FINALISTS WILL RECEIVE


In Memory of Neil Lawrence sponsored by Commonwealth Private - 1st Prize

The winner of the In Memory of Neil Lawrence Prize will receive $30,000 to support their project and a perpetual Nick Mount hand blown glass trophy.


Bayer Innovation Award - 2nd Prize 

The runner-up will receive $15,000 to continue to develop their research.


Val Morgan Award - 3rd Prize

The third place prize winner will receive $10,000 to pursue his/her research goals.


A People's Choice Award will be voted on by the general public and research community and the successful applicant will be awarded a $2,000 prize.


PAST WINNERS


The history of Award winners


2017 Centenary Institute Medical Innovation Award


2016 Centenary Institute Medical Innovation Award


2015 Centenary Institute Medical Innovation Award



MEDIA


Newborn babies at heart of life-saving research - The Australian


Young scientists struggling to stay in industry - ABC The World Today


Qld memory scientist wins $25k prize - SBS


Qld memory scientist wins $25k prize - 9News.com.au


Qld memory scientist wins $25k prize - news.com.au


TESTIMONIALS


DIRECTOR OF WEHI, PROFESSOR DOUG HILTON, BSC MONASH BSC (HONS) PHD MELBOURNE FAA FTSE

The Centenary Institute Lawrence Creative Prize is a wonderful initiative to award early career medical researchers who are embarking on their independent program. At a time where they haven’t built up the track record to compete with established, senior researchers, recognizing their creativity and innovation with the Lawrence Creative Prize not only offers them financial support but also boosts their profile, giving them a competitive advantage when applying for research funding.


I urge Australians and sponsors alike to get behind the Lawrence Creative Prize. You will be supporting our young scientists who have the brilliance to think of new ideas and the courage to test them out, in their common quest to advance our knowledge of the diseases affecting today’s society.


EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR OF GARVAN INSTITUTE OF MEDICAL RESEARCH, JOHN MATTICK AO FAA FRCPA(HON)

I am writing to say how influential and important the Centenary Lawrence Creative prize has become for young investigators in Australian biomedical research. The Centenary Institute is to be congratulated for this initiative, which has brought it great credit and great publicity. It is quickly becoming the premier prize for emerging investigators across Australia and, most importantly, rewards and encourages the beautiful and essential intersection between creativity, logic and achievement in science. I very much hope it will continue, and thank you on behalf of the community.


NOBEL PRIZE-WINNING IMMUNOLOGIST, PROFESSOR ROLF ZINKERNAGEL:

Typically, it is early in their careers that scientists are at their most creative. It’s as PhD students and post-doctoral fellows that they generate the ideas that set the pattern of their studies to come. I should know. My collaboration with Peter Doherty that led to our joint Nobel Prize began as a post-doctoral fellow in Canberra. But because early career researchers have no track record, support from the established funding bodies is hard to come by. So, I’m heartened to see a Prize whose purpose is to encourage Australia’s best young biomedical researchers to express their creativity. And it just might encourage them to stay in Australia and build their careers here.


2018 ADJUDICATORS

The Prize’s stellar line-up of adjudicators comprises of some of the most distinguished and prestigious scientists around the world including members of the Centenary Institute Scientific Advisory Board.


Professor Ian Frazer AC

Translational Research Institute Ambassador and Chair of TRI Foundation Board, The University of Queensland Diamantina Institute, Queensland, AUS


Professor Mathew Vadas AO

Executive Director, Centenary Institute, New South Wales, AUS.


Professor Jane Visvader

The Victorian Breast Cancer Research Consortium Laboratory, Walter and Eliza Hall Institute of Medical Research, Victoria, AUS.


Professor Michael Good AO

Institute of Glycomics, Griffith University, Gold Coast Campus, Queensland, AUS.


Professor Jenny Stow

Head, Protein trafficking and Inflammation University of Queensland Institute for Molecular Bioscience (IMB), The University of Queensland, AUS.


Professor Matthias W Hentze

Director, European Molecular Biology Laboratory (EMBL), Heidelberg, GERMANY.


Professor Ashley Bush

Director of the Oxidation Biology Unit at the Florey Institute of Neuroscience and Mental Health.


Professor Michael W Parker

Director, Bio21 Molecular Science and Biotechnology Institute (Bio21 Institute), Professor, Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, University of Melbourne and Head of Structural Biology ACRF Drug Discovery Centre, St. Vincent’s Institute of Medical Research.


Professor Sir Marc Feldman AC

Head, Kennedy Institute of Rheumatology, Nuffield Department of Orthopaedics, Rheumatology and Musculoskeletal Sciences, University of Oxford.


Professor Peter Leedman, MBBS, PhD, FRACP, FAHMS

Director Harry Perkins Institute of Medical Research


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Many of our senior researchers are specialist clinicians at Royal Prince Alfred Hospital and lecturers at the University of Sydney. Their direct, personal experience with patients inspires their work to improve and save lives. Our close ties with the University and Hospital mean our scientists are not isolated from the people who are affected by the major diseases we are working to overcome. ...